Teenage dating and violence

Teen dating violence is a widespread issue that can occur between current and former dating partners, in person, or electronically.

Examples include physical and emotional harm, as well as stalking.

While reports of physical abuse went down over time, they say there is a troubling gender-related trend.

Five percent of teens reported physical abuse from their dating partners in 2013, down from 6 percent in 2003.

“This has been found in studies of adolescents in other countries as well.” Researchers looked at data collected from three British Columbia Adolescent Health Surveys conducted over a 10-year timespan.

Participants were 35,900 students in grades 7 through 12 who were in dating relationships.

Lela Rankin Williams, Ph D, is associate professor and coordinator, School of Social Work, Tucson Component, Arizona State University, 340 N.

Commerce Park Loop, Suite 250, Tucson, AZ; e-mail: [email protected]

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It is the responsibility of the user to evaluate the content and usefulness of information obtained from non-federal sites.Heidi Adams Rueda, Ph D, is assistant professor, Department of Social Work, University of Texas at San Antonio Lela Rankin Williams, Ph D, is associate professor and coordinator, School of Social Work, Tucson Component, Arizona State University, 340 N.Heidi Adams Rueda, Ph D, is assistant professor, Department of Social Work, University of Texas at San Antonio Teen dating violence (TDV) affects adolescents’ overall wellness, subsequent social–emotional and academic development, and future success.“Young people who experience dating violence are more likely to act out and take unnecessary risks, and they’re also more likely to experience depression or think about or attempt suicide,” she says.“That’s why it’s good to see that decline in dating violence over a 10-year span.

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